All in Media

John Lee Dumas

At 32 years old, John Lee Dumas took a risk. A big one. He quit a career in commercial real estate to start a podcast. He had no idea how he would find an audience and, once he did, he had no idea how he would make money from them. Seven years and $15 million dollars in revenue later, it’s safe to say he figured it out.

Jim McFarlin

As one of the very first people of color to review popular music for a major daily newspaper, Jim McFarlin spent an enormous amount of time with the world’s best-known musicians. However, getting cover stories from Bob Seeger and Ted Nugent seemed easy compared to fighting for his identity as a child…and fighting for his life as an adult.

Brant Hansen

As a child he was diagnosed with Asperger’s and an eye issue that makes it difficult to look people in the eye, yet remarkably Brant Hansen has a radio audience of millions. Even more remarkable is that—given how he was treated by his dad (a pastor)—Brant spends most of his time talking about faith.

Ana Marie Cox

Ana Marie Cox’s career in journalism led her to tell the stories of politicians, musicians and activists for MTV News, Time, GQ, and The New York Times. But the story Ana was living—filled with addiction and divorce and attempted suicide—was one she wasn’t at all ready to tell.

Suze Orman

She has twice been named one of the 100 most influential people in the world, yet Suze never would have guessed that kind of recognition was on the way when she was living in a van. Or making $400 a month as a waitress. But 15 seconds changed the entire trajectory of her career.

Tim Sinclair

As a pastor’s kid turned public figure, it became easy for Tim to compartmentalize his life and show others only what he thought they wanted or needed to see. That strategy eventually filtered into his personal relationships and multiple (yes, multiple) marriages. His voice was heard by millions, but his heart was known by no one.